Blog Tours/Street Teams, The Daevabad Trilogy

Parallels Between Ali & Nahri in The Kingdom of Copper (Guest Post)

Another guest post today which is the second part of Jade’s parallels post!

A continuation of the Nahri and Ali parallels in The City of Brass, this post takes a look at their actions and situations in The Kingdom of Copper. 

Photo by Jade

During my rereads of the Daevabad Trilogy, I’ve noticed a number of parallels between the two main protagonists, Nahri and Prince Alizayd. From their echoed actions and thoughts to certain life circumstances, Nahri and Ali are like two corner pieces that eventually meet in the middle.

Featuring major spoilers for The City of Brass and The Kingdom of Copper, I’ve compiled a list with 39 examples. I’ve divided these into three categories: actions/thoughts, life circumstances, and skills/interests, with quotes and page numbers (from the US hardback copies) for context. Let’s dive in! 

THE KINGDOM OF COPPER (with callbacks to The City of Brass) (20)

Actions/Thoughts 

  1. Reprimanding their unadventurous companions. KoC (Nahri, ch. 1 pg. 42: “You know, for a magical being, you have a terrible sense of adventure.” and Ali, ch. 2 pg. 53: “And you are all sadly lacking a spirit of enterprise.”) 
  2. Fear of the future, don’t feel like they can be happy. KoC (Ali, ch. 2 pg. 61: “Dread crept over him. Yes, it seemed to answer, swallowing the simple fantasies running through his mind’s eye. For in Ali’s experience, dreaming of a better future had only ever led to destruction.” and Nahri, ch. 26 pg. 424: “When I try to imagine my future here, Nisreen, I see nothing. I feel like the very act of envisioning the things that make me happy will destroy them.”) 
  3. Denying their temperament and what might fix it. KoC (Ali, ch. 2 pg. 58-59: [Lubayd:] “You should start building a life here. I suspect marriage would vastly improve your temperament.” […] “an irritable prince exiled to the land of his forefathers . . .” Ali’s temper finally snapped as he reached for the tent flap. “I am not irritable.” and Nahri, ch. 6 pg. 111: [Muntadhir:] “And you clearly need to relax. Consider it a professional duty.” His hands slipped underneath her tunic. “Surely your patients will be better served by having a Banu Nahida who’s not in such a snappish mood.” Nahri sighed, pressing closer to him despite herself. […] “I am not snappish . . .”) 
  4. Marriage being used as an excuse to get rest. KoC (Nahri, ch. 6 pg. 111: “She had been under a great deal of stress lately, and she often got more sleep the nights she spent in Muntadhir’s room;” and Ali, ch. 22 pg. 355: [Hatset:] “it wouldn’t be the worst idea for you to burn a marriage mask with a nice shafit girl. Maybe then you’d actually visit your bed instead of working yourself to death.”) 
  5. Thinks the other looks good in their feast outfit. KoC (Ali, ch. 12 pg. 214: “Ali looked equally taken aback by the sight of Nahri, his shocked gaze traveling from her uncovered head down her bare arms. She heard him take a sharp breath.” and Nahri, ch. 12 pg. 215: “Nahri hated to admit such a thing, but he looked striking in his new clothes, the beautifully dyed robe highlighting his haughty features and luminous dark skin.”
  6. “It was the wrong thing to say.” KoC (Nahri, ch. 23 pg. 381: “Ghassan gave her an annoyed look. ‘Stand down, Banu Nahri,’ he said condescendingly. ‘I do not have the patience for one of your self-important speeches right now. Let your husband punish you as he sees fit.’ It was exactly the wrong thing to say.” and Ali, ch. 29 pg. 461: “Muntadhir drew nearer, his grin fading. ‘Or maybe you’ve been intruding upon my world for so long—insinuating yourself with my wife, embarrassing me before Abba—that you’ve forgotten your place.’ He said the final words in Geziriyya, his voice low. ‘Maybe you need a reminder.’ It was the wrong thing to say.”)
  7. Terrified of the other standing up to Ghassan, fear they’ll be killed for it. KoC (Ali, ch. 25 pg. 406: “He could still remember her—small in comparison to his father, exhausted and covered in ash, but thoroughly defiant, heat rippling through the air when she spoke, the stone street shivering with magic. It was one of the bravest acts he’d ever witnessed. And it petrified him, for Ali knew all too well how his father handled threats.” and Nahri, ch. 28 pg. 450: “‘And how many more people will die while we wait for that day?’ Their gazes locked. There was nothing but conviction in the warm gray of his eyes. No cunning, no deception. It terrified her. Because whatever history was between them, Nahri did not think she had it in her to watch the kind man who’d built her this office, this quiet homage to the home she still loved—the man who’d taught her to read and helped her summon flames for the first time—be executed in the arena.”) 
  8. Moving slowly with exhaustion in every line of their body. KoC (Ali, ch. 28, pg. 443: “Ali sat up. His movements were slow, bone-weary exhaustion written into every line of his body.” and Nahri, ch. 31 pg. 486: “He watched her set aside the forceps and touch the little boy’s face before pushing slowly to her feet, exhaustion in every line of her body.”)
  9. Asking God for help before attempting something scary. KoC (Nahri, ch. 30 pg. 481: “A sandstorm. Nahri caught her breath. Creator, please, she prayed. Help me save my city.” and Ali, ch. 31 pg. 492: “God forgive me. God guide me. ‘I’m very sorry, Abu Nuwas,’ he said quietly. Ali’s hand dropped to his khanjar. ‘But I’m not going back to the palace.'”) 
  10. Horrified at the thought of ghouls entering their city and devouring innocents. Interestingly, both situations had ghouls unleashed by Vizaresh with Dara present. CoB (Nahri, ch. 2 pg. 34: “‘You mean there’s a chance these things might get out and start feasting on everyone in Cairo?’ He looked thoughtful. ‘That would provide a distraction…’ Perhaps noticing her horror, he quickly changed the subject.”) and KoC (Ali, ch. 36 pg. 536: “And then his heart stopped. A ragged hole had been punched into the wall facing the street. […] ‘Are those things in our city?’”)
  11. Pulled the ceiling down on someone they love. CoB (Ali, ch. 28 pg. 497: “The rain drummed against the glass above him, the water achingly close. […] Ali took a deep breath, trying to quell the emotions churning inside him. Something metallic groaned above their heads. A small leak sprang. […] The roof gave out.”) and KoC (Nahri, ch. 38 pg. 565-566: “Nahri inhaled, suddenly aware of every brick and stone and mote of dust in the building around her. […] In an explosion of plaster and stone, Nahri brought the ceiling down on him.”) 
  12. Admitting in a daze that the other is their friend. CoB (Ali, ch. 24 pg. 436: “‘You’re not terrible,’ he declared. ‘You’re my friend.’”) and KoC (Nahri, ch. 40 pg. 592: “‘He… He’s my friend.’ It was a ridiculous answer and yet it was the first that came to her.”)

Life Circumstances

  1. Bad reputation with a tribe they haven’t actually hurt. CoB (Ali, ch. 8 pg. 157: [regarding Kaveh:] “‘He wants you away from Abba, ideally away from Daevabad and back in Am Gezira, where you can’t do anything to hurt his people.’ Ali threw up his hands. ‘I haven’t done anything to his people!'”) and KoC (Nahri, ch. 8 pg. 125: “She bristled. ‘Why should they hate me? I was raised in the human world!’ ‘And then you came back here at the side of a man famous for using a scourge to determine the color of someone’s blood,’ Muntadhir pointed out. ‘You have a reputation with them, Nahri, like it or not.'”) 
  2. Understands the feeling of their appearance not matching the expectation of their role. KoC (Ali, Nahri, ch. 21 pg. 350: “‘No,’ he replied tonelessly. ‘I suppose of the two of us, Muntadhir looks more like what people expect of a Qahtani prince.’ She realized too late the double meaning of her words. ‘Oh, no, Ali. That’s not what I meant. Not at all.’ Every time Nahri pinned her chador over her human-round ears, she had the same feelings about her appearance not matching expectations, and it made her sick to think she might have implied the same to someone else.”) 
  3. Attacked by a massive marid-controlled water beast. CoB (Nahri, ch. 11 pg. 211: “A serpent the size of a small mountain and made entirely of rushing black water.”) and KoC (Ali, ch. 33 pg. 507-508: “The water was rising. […] It rose higher and higher, blocking the stars and mountains to tower over the city. The rough outline of a reptilian head formed, it’s mouth opening to reveal glistening fangs.”)
  4. Attacked by a swarm of ghouls, with one biting into their shoulder. CoB (Nahri, ch. 2 pg. 37: “Managing to wrench an elbow free, she shoved at it hard. The ghoul fell away but took a good piece of her shoulder with it.”) and KoC (Ali, ch. 36 pg. 545: “There was a blur of bone, the scent of rot and blood overwhelming as they tore into him. Ali screamed as one bit deeply into his already wounded shoulder.”) 
  5. They both have their father’s eyes. CoB (Ali, ch. 4 pg. 64: “All he’d inherited from his father was his dark steel eyes.”) and KoC (Nahri, ch. 40 pg. 592: [Manizheh:] “Marid curse be damned– you still have his eyes.”)
  6. Both have a monsterous family member that will kill innocents to reach their goals. KoC (Nahri, ch. 19 pg. 320: [Dara:] ‘These are innocents. Children. Travelers coming to celebrate Navasatem…’ […] ‘Then we will be monsters.’ Manizheh declared. ‘I will pay that price to end this war.’” and Ali, ch. 25 pg. 410: “He knew his father had done some awful things, but sinking a ship full of fleeing child refugees was pure evil. It didn’t matter who Ghassan had been hunting.”)

Skills/interests

  1. Talks a lot about the things that interest them. CoB (Ali, ch. 20 pg. 358: “He’d answer, she knew; he answered all her questions. By God, sometimes he talked so much it could be difficult to get him to stop.”) and KoC (Nahri, ch. 6 pg. 109: [Muntadhir:] “You, who barely stops talking about your work in the infirmary, discovered your ancestors’ old hospital and a group of freed ifrit slaves, and your only comment is ‘It was interesting’?”) 
  2. Strongly deny facts they don’t want to face. KoC (Nahri, ch. 9 pg. 178: [regarding Dara] “He wouldn’t have started a war. I wouldn’t have let him.” and Ali, ch. 9 pg. 179: [Nahri:] “’They changed you, didn’t they? The marid?’ Ali went cold. ‘No,’ he insisted, to himself as much as to her. ‘They did nothing.’”) 

That’s all for now! Can’t wait to see what new parallels and callbacks exist in The Empire of Gold.

You can find Jade on her social media here:

Instagram: @leafyjade

Twitter: @leafyjade

Tumblr: Musogato

Blog Tours/Street Teams, The Daevabad Trilogy

Parallels Between Ali & Nahri in The City of Brass (Guest Post)

Today for the World of Daevabad Blog Tour I have a guest post by Jade! She is going to be discussing the parallels between Ali and Nahri in The City of Brass. Enjoy!

Nahri Fanart by Jade

During my rereads of the Daevabad Trilogy, I’ve noticed something curious about the two main protagonists, Nahri and Prince Alizayd. While they are definitely their own characters with their own arcs, they also share a surprising amount of similarities and parallels, even down to the language used. From their echoed actions and thoughts to certain life circumstances, Nahri and Ali are like two corner pieces that eventually meet in the middle.

Featuring major spoilers for The City of Brass and The Kingdom of Copper, I’ve compiled a list with 39 examples. However because of the length, I am splitting this into two posts, to cover each book. I’ve further divided these into three categories: actions/thoughts, life circumstances, and skills/interests, with quotes and page numbers (from the US hardback copies) for context. Let’s dive in! 

THE CITY OF BRASS (19)

Actions/Thoughts 

  1. Believing Daeva (& Nahid) shafit were probably killed as babies. CoB (Ali, ch. 6 pg. 128: “They probably smother them in their cradles.” and Nahri, ch. 7 pg. 143: “I probably would have been killed before my first birthday!”)
  2. Didn’t want to walk to the garden together when they first met. CoB (Nahri, ch. 16 pg. 284: “‘That isn’t necessary,’ she protested. She wasn’t the only one. Alizayd pointed in Dara’s direction, a flurry of Geziriyya coming from his mouth.”) 
  3. Secretly observing the other, but Ali got caught. CoB (Nahri, ch. 16 pg. 285: “He glanced over, probably in the hope of studying her in a similar fashion, but their eyes caught, and he quickly looked away.”) 
  4. Considering the other person odd. CoB (Nahri, ch. 18 pg. 333: “What an odd person.” and Ali, ch. 25 pg. 443: “She was odd, to be sure.”)
  5. Becoming friends as part of an agenda, and then falling for it. CoB (Ali, ch. 26 pg. 468: “I was their primary benefactor. My father found out and ordered me to befriend you and convince you to marry my brother as penance.” and Nahri, ch. 18 pg. 336: “And Nahri wanted to know what was in his books, especially if the information was damaging to Dara. If making this awkward boy her tutor was the best way to protect herself and her Afshin, then by all means. Besides . . . she did want to learn how to read.”) 
  6. Taking note of the other’s laugh, use of the word warm. CoB (Nahri, ch. 20 pg. 355: “Ali laughed, a warm sound she rarely heard that always took her a bit by surprise.” and Ali, ch. 23 pg. 405: “Nahri laughed. It was the first time he’d heard her laugh in days, and the sound warmed his heart.”) 
  7. Liking the other’s intelligence and curiousity. CoB (Ali, ch. 23 pg. 407: “He was enjoying his time with Nahri, he couldn’t help it. She was as intellectually curious as he was, and her life in the human world made for fascinating conversation.”) and KoC (Nahri, ch. 10 pg. 182: “She’d liked spending time with someone who shared her intellect and her curiosity, with someone who didn’t make her feel self-conscious about her ignorance of the magical world or her human skin.”)
  8. Viewing their time together as a light. CoB (Nahri, ch. 20 pg. 358: “…and strangely enough, she was beginning to enjoy their afternoons together, the one bright spot in her monotonous, frustrating days.” and Ali, ch. 26 pg. 468: “It’s been a dark few months. My time with you . . . it was a light.”) 
  9. Comparing Dara to a statue. CoB (Ali, ch. 19 pg. 345: “The power behind the Afshin’s blows made it feel like sparring with a statue.” and Nahri, ch. 26 pg. 462: “She grabbed Dara’s arm and tried to wrest him off, but it was like fighting a statue.”) 
  10. Stepping in front of the other when faced with a threat. CoB (Nahri, ch. 26 pg. 465: “The Afshin swore and turned around. Nahri swiftly stepped between them. ‘Leave him alone.'” and Ali, ch. 26 pg. 472: “Ali immediately stepped in front of her. ‘She’s as innocent as I am, Dhiru.’”) They also do this with Rashid (CoB) and Manizheh (KoC). 

Life Circumstances

  1. At risk of being killed as a baby because of who they were. CoB (Nahri, ch. 7 pg. 143: “‘Nahri, you didn’t grow up in my world. You can’t understand.’ ‘Thank God I didn’t! I probably would have been killed before my first birthday!’ Dara said nothing, his silence more revealing than any denial.” and Ali, ch. 29 pg. 501: [Ghassan:] “A second son with a powerful mother from a wealthy tribe. […] Within a day of your birth, I had two assassins from Am Gezira present themselves at court. Skilled men, the best at what they did, offering discreet ways to end my dilemma.”) 
  2. Their main friend before meeting each other was an old man. CoB (Nahri, ch. 1 pg. 13: [with Yaqub] “She didn’t need to scare off her only friend simply because she had a few strange skills.” and Ali, ch. 6 pg. 130: [after Sheikh Anas’ execution] “He’d just witnessed the brutal death of his closest friend.”) 
  3. Having people close to them decry their friendship for tribal reasons. CoB (Nahri, ch. 20 pg. 361: [Dara:] “Alizayd al Qahtani? Really Nahri? Could you not find an ifrit to befriend?” and [Nisreen, ch. 24 pg. 426:] “you spend all your free time with that Qahtani zealot… Nahri, our tribe doesn’t think lightly of disloyalty; we’ve suffered too much at the hands of our enemies.” and Ali, ch. 21 pg. 381: [Rashid:] “You don’t take friends from among the fire worshippers, Alizayd. That’s how they trick you.”)
  4. They both survived something tearing into their throat before their world was irrevocably changed. CoB (Nahri, ch. 2 pg. 38: “Something popped in her elbow, but the pain barely registered. Because at the same time, it tore into her throat.” and Ali, ch. 26 pg. 476: “The young prince hit the wet deck hard and slid to the boat’s edge. He scrambled to his feet. ‘Munta–’ Dara shot him through the throat.”) 
  5. Connection to the marid. CoB (Nahri, ch. 11 pg. 203: [Sakhr:] “’Astonishing really, I give the marid their due. At first glance, you’re completely human, but look past that and . . .’ He stepped closer to study her face. ‘There’s the daeva.’” and Ali, ch. 28 pg. 495: “A marid. He stared at his dripping hands as nausea swept over him. I gave my name and let some water demon use my body like a shiny new blade to murder the Afshin.”) 
  6. They were saved by a monster. KoC (Nahri, ch. 10 pg. 188: [Muntadhir:] “And because for all her supposed cleverness, she couldn’t see that the dashing hero who saved her was actually its monster.” and Ali, ch. 11 pg. 209 : “The marid were a terror in Ta Ntry, monsters to be feared. Monsters who had saved him.”

Skills/interests

  1. Knows how to open a locked door. CoB (Nahri, ch. 2 pg 35: “‘It’s locked,’ she said. ‘Give me one of your daggers, I’ll pick it.’” and Ali, ch. 4 pg. 75: “Fortunately, Ali was Citadel trained– and the Daevas were troublemakers enough that breaking through the enchantments they used to guard their homes and businesses was a skill taught to the youngest cadets. He closed his eyes, murmuring the first incantation that came to mind. The door swung open.”) 
  2. They both enjoy being in the water. CoB (Nahri, ch. 2 pg. 48: “The press of the cool water was like the touch of a friend.” and Ali, ch. 25 pg. 442: “He liked it, even if most djinn –especially his father’s people– looked upon swimming with utter revulsion.”) 
  3. An interest in reading, economics, Egypt. CoB  Reading: (Nahri, ch. 18 pg. 334: “She ran a hand along the multihued spines, overtaken by a sense of longing. ‘Do you like to read?’ Alizayd asked. Nahri hesitated, embarrassed to admit her illiteracy to a man with such a large personal library. ‘I suppose you could say I like the idea of reading.’”) Economics: (Nahri, ch. 18 pg. 335: “’I would like to know how people run businesses in Daevabad, how they make money, negotiate with each other, that sort of thing.’ […] Something seemed to perk up in his face. ‘Economics, then . . .’ He sounded strangely excited.”) and Egypt: (Ali, ch. 18 pg. 336: “I must admit an obsession with the human world. […] Particularly your corner of it. I’ve never met anyone from Egypt. I’d love to learn more about it, hear your stories, and perhaps even improve my own Arabic.”) 

Next time: Kingdom of Copper! 

Make sure to go follow Jade on her social media! (She has created some excellent fanart of the books too)

Twitter: @leafyjade

Instagram: @leafyjade

Tumblr: Musogato

Book Tag, Muslim Shelf Space, The Daevabad Trilogy

Daevabad Book Tag

Today is the first day of the World of Daevabad Blog Tour! Make sure you check out my previous blog post to see who is taking part!

Okay so obviously everyone knows how obsessed I am with the Daevabad trilogy by S.A. Chakraborty so I have created a book tag inspired by the books!

And if you haven’t read the books then you really need to fix that!

So you can do this book tag on your blog, Instagram or twitter just make sure you link back to this post and tag me (IG: @thetsundokuchronicles Twitter: @thetsundokuc)

Also make sure you use the hashtag #DaevabadBookTag so everyone can find your post!

Tag some people so they can also take part and have fun!

So here is the book tag:

1 Nahri e-Nahid – Resourceful character

2 Alizayd al-Qahtani – Nerdy character

3 Qahtani siblings – favourite sibling relationship

4 Darayavahoush e-Afshin – Broody character

5 Jinns, Marids & Peris – Books with mythical beings

6 Daevabad – Books with magical cities

7 Ghassan al-Qahtani – Villain you root for

8 Muntadhir al-Qahtani – Dramatic characters

9 Zaynab al-Qahtani – Books about female empowerment

10 Navasatem – Books with celebrations or feast scenes

11 Queen Hatset – Books with royals

12 Jamshid e-Pramukh – Character that took you by surprise

13 Lubayd & Aqisa – Favourite sidekicks

14 Royal Guard – Books with epic battles

15 Emir Joon – OTP

And here are my answers for the tag:

1 I love how resourceful Shahrzad from The Wrath and the Dawn is.

2 Cress from The Lunar Chronicles is an absolute nerd and fangirl and I loved her so much!

3 I love Laia and Darin from An Ember in the Ashes. They go to the ends of the earth for each other and to protect each other.

4 Nasir from We Hunt the Flame is the ultimate broody character!

5 The Beautiful is a murder mystery with werewolves and vampires!

6 Wicked as you Wish has a magical city and lots of fairytale references.

7 The Darkling is a wonderfully complex villain who truly believes that what he is doing is for the best for his people and it leads him to commit unspeakable atrocities.

8 Hypnos from The Gilded Wolves is ridiculously dramatic and I loved him so much!

9 The Candle and the Flame is full of amazing women getting stuff done!

10 That Can Be Arranged by Huda Fahmy has a wedding scene!

11 The Tiger at Midnight by Swati Teerdhala has several royal characters and even a lost princess.

12 Carmen from We Set the Dark on Fire was surprising in many ways. I wasn’t sure what to make of her when I started the book and she really surprised me.

13 I really loved the side characters in The Extinction Trials by S.M. Wilson. They were so well rounded and I was totally rooting for them and was absolutely terrified for them!

14 The Nyxia trilogy is full of epic battles and I really loved reading them, they were completely enthralling!

15 If you know me then you know that my ultimate OTP is Adam and Zayneb! I absolutely adore them and their friendship and how they slowly fall in love while keeping it halal.

So that’s all of my answers!

Everyone is welcome to do the tag! I hope you enjoy doing it!

Be sure to check out all the other posts too!

Blog Tours/Street Teams, The Daevabad Trilogy

Daevabad Blog Tour Schedule

Hello booknerds! So today I am going to be sharing some exciting things! Me and some of my fellow Daevabad fans wanted to do something to celebrate the release of The Empire of Gold by S.A. Chakraborty so we decided to do an unofficial blog tour!

So over the rest of June we will be sharing Daevabad related posts from discussions to fun posts and more! I cannot wait for you all to see what we will be sharing! In this post I will be sharing everyone who is part of the blog tour and the link to their blog so you can check out their post!

Also shoutout to Zulfa (@LovelyOwlsBooks) who created the amazing graphics for the blog tour!

So here is the schedule:

11th June

The Tsundoku Chronicles

13th June

Lovely Owls Books

15th June

The Tsundoku Chronicles (Guest Post)

17th June

Star Is All Booked Up

19th June

Lost in Fantasy

21st June

The Tsundoku Chronicles (Guest Post)

23rd June

Dee’s Library

25th June

The Tsundoku Chronicles

27th June

Violette Books

30th June

The Tsundoku Chronicles

So that is the blog tour schedule! I can’t wait for you all to see the posts from all the amazing bloggers involved!

I am also currently co-hosting a Daevabad themed photo challenge on Instagram which also has a giveaway if anyone wants to join! You can find the details here

Book Recommendations, Booksish Discussions, The Daevabad Trilogy

Netflix Adapts Daevabad – (I Hope)

Earlier this week, Shannon caused my world to stop spinning when she shared the news that Netflix are developing The City of Brass trilogy into a show. As you can imagine I absolutely lost it. I spent a very unproductive afternoon screaming about this on the potato heads discord and also on my twitter.

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I am simultaneously excited and terrified about this though. I mean I know that it may never actually make it to actually becoming a show BUT if it does, will they do the books justice?

I need them to cast the characters properly, I don’t want any whitewashing of the characters and the characters are all different ethnicities that I really hope they get it right. Alizayd and Zaynab are Somali, Muntadhir is arab, Jamshid and Dara are Persian and that’s not even including all the other tribes who come from all over the world. Please, please, please get it right Netflix. I will absolutely riot if they don’t.

But Shannon has said that if this show gets made she will be involved in it so at least I can breathe a little easier now.

And just imagine if they get it right, it would be absolutely stunning and a show of epic proportions! The stunning scenery, the beautiful outfits, the delicious food, omg I am going to sob my way through that first episode.

Speaking of first episodes, the first chapter opens with the fajr adhaan and Nahri in a black abaya! I am actually going to cry if they open with that. And Ali’s first chapter is him praying fajr too and I will finally get to see a YOUNG PRACTICING MUSLIM WHO FIGHTS FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE on screen. ON SCREEN. Just the thought of seeing that is making me sob. Can you imagine all those young Muslim boys who will watch this and see a practicing Muslim man who is also the hero and that they aren’t mutually exclusive?!

I have such high hopes for this show, please Netflix don’t disappoint me. I will come for you all if you mess this up!

There are so many scenes I am so excited about seeing from the royal library with the librarians on their magic carpets to Ali and Nahri studying and geeking out in the library. The scene with Ghassan and Ali (chapter 17) which was INTENSE and just imagining that scene is going to be amazing. Also when Nahri first summons Dara and she realises that maybe Yaqub was right and she should have listened to him. There is just so so much I want to see in this show.

I could actually see all my favourite characters come to life! There will be a theme song there will be new fans and it could mean that so many more people could pick up this absolutely phenomenal trilogy to read the source material.

This book means so much to me on so many levels and being able to see it on screen, a fantasy that has a middle eastern setting that has people of colour as the main characters, that shows Muslims as the heroes. It could be everything and more and I hope it gets the justice and hype it absolutely deserves.